An Elegy for Harry Dean Stanton

Lucky, Directed by John Carroll Lynch By Pamela Zoslov When I saw the trailer for “Lucky,” the film featuring one of the last performances of Harry Dean Stanton, who died September 15 at age 91, I was struck by how frail he appeared, a skinny wraith lighting cigarette upon cigarette. (“I only eat so I […]

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The Fire This Time: Whose Streets?

Whose Streets?  Directed by Sabaah Folayan and Damon Davis By Pamela Zoslov It’s been three years since Michael Brown, an unarmed 18-year-old, was shot to death by police officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri, after being stopped for walking in the middle of the street and allegedly raising his hands in surrender. Brown’s body was […]

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Menashe: A Yiddisher Kop

By Pamela Zoslov Joshua Weinstein didn’t have an easy time making his movie Menashe. The filmmaker drew his cast of nonprofessional actors from members of the Hasidic Jewish community in Borough Park, Brooklyn. Many had never even seen a movie before. Some signed on and then dropped out, fearing the disapproval of their synagogues and […]

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Landline: Kickin’ It Old School

By Pamela Zoslov Gillian Robespierre’s new comedy, Landline, has many traits in common with her debut feature, Obvious Child, which got a lot of attention due to its abortion story line. Both films focus on the romantic/sexual misadventures of a young woman played by comedienne Jenny Slate, and are sprinkled with copious amounts of scatological […]

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Maudie: A World of Her Own

By Pamela Zoslov The difference between Art and Life is that Art is more bearable. — Charles Bukowski “A World Without Shadows” is the title of a stage play and short film about Maud Lewis, a celebrated Canadian folk artist who lived most of her life in a tiny, primitive house in Nova Scotia, covering […]

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